On 12 March 1989 the World Wide Web said Hello for the very first time. Happy birthday www! We all thank you, Sir Tim Berners-Lee!

“Vague but exciting.”

This was how Sir Tim Berners-Lee’s boss responded to his proposal titled “Information Management: A Proposal,” submitted on this day in 1989, when the inventor of the World Wide Web was a 33-year-old software engineer.

Initially, Berners-Lee envisioned “a large hypertext database with typed links,”named  “Mesh,” to help his colleagues at CERN (a large nuclear physics laboratory in Switzerland) share information amongst multiple computers.

Berners-Lee’s boss allowed him time to develop the humble flowchart into a working model, writing the HTML language, the HTTP application, and WorldWideWeb.app— the first Web browser and page editor. By 1991, the external Web servers were up and running.

The Web would soon revolutionize life as we know it, ushering in the information age. Today, there are nearly 2 billion websites online. Whether you use it for email, homework, gaming, or checking out videos of cute puppies, chances are you can’t imagine life without the Web.

Word Wide Web

Not to be confused with the internet, which had been evolving since the 1960s, the World Wide Web is an online application built upon innovations like HTML language, URL “addresses,” and hypertext transfer protocol, or HTTP. The Web has also become a decentralized community, founded on principles of universality, consensus, and bottom-up design.

“There are very few innovations that have truly changed everything,” said Jeff Jaffe, CEO of the World Wide Web Consortium. “The Web is the most impactful innovation of our time.”

Happy 30th Anniversary to the World Wide Web!

Explore the history of the invention of the World Wide Web on Google Arts & Culture, courtesy of The Science Museum and CERN.

Source: Google Doodle

Sir Tim Berners-Lee

Sir Timothy John Berners-Lee, also known as TimBL, is an English engineer and computer scientist, best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web. He is currently a professor of computer science at the University of Oxford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee
Sir Tim Berners-Lee

On the World Wide Web’s 30th birthday, the founder and web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee reflects on how the web has changed our world and what we must do to build a better web that serves all of humanity.

Please share using #Web30 #ForTheWeb.

#ForTheWeb

#Web30

30 years on, what’s next #ForTheWeb?

Sir Timothy John Berners-Lee said:

“Today, 30 years on from my original proposal for an information management system, half the world is online. It’s a moment to celebrate how far we’ve come, but also an opportunity to reflect on how far we have yet to go.

The web has become a public square, a library, a doctor’s office, a shop, a school, a design studio, an office, a cinema, a bank, and so much more. Of course with every new feature, every new website, the divide between those who are online and those who are not increases, making it all the more imperative to make the web available for everyone. “

Continue reading his letter…

2 Comments on “30th Anniversary of the World Wide Web

  1. Pingback: 30 Day Blogging Challenge – IDEADECO

  2. Pingback: 90 Days of Real Blog Topics – IDEADECO

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.