Moussakas – The King of Greek cuisine

Moussakas Day

The King of Greek cuisine!

Moussakas

Try the recipe and enjoy a magnificent healthy meal for the whole family.

With a little help from Maninio.com today it is a good day to have moussakas for lunch and dinner. I followed her recipe step by step and finally a delicious moussakas is waiting to be eaten on the top of our dinning table. Hip Hip Hooray! Happy forks and knives situation!

Come on… I know you want to try it, too. Give it a shot!

Moussakas – The King of Greek cuisine

Maninio Food & Travel Blog

She wrote:

I smile and reassured her “Don’t worry, you will lick your fingers, I have made it many times”- here hangs the Greek saying “If you do not praise your own home, it will fall on you and squash you!” Of course, I put eggplant – Moussaka without eggplant would not be a moussaka. They all really enjoy it, even her son raved “Although I hate eggplant and never eat it, the taste of it fits perfectly and it’s very tasty”. Happy end! 

Moussakas – The King of Greek cuisine

The King of Dinner

Despite the fact majority of Greeks believe that Moussaka is of Greek origin, actually it originated from the Persian maguma, a dish that is a combination of lamb and eggplant. The Greek version of Moussaka dates from the beginning of the 20th century. In 1910 Chef Nicholas Tselementes released the Greek version / recipe of Moussaka where the difference from the Persian lies in the addition of the béchamel (white) sauce and the omission of many spices. 

The traditional Moussaka consists of fried eggplants, minced veal / beef, kefalotyri (a type of Greek sheep’s milk cheese) and a rich egg based béchamel. Τhere are other variations with addition of fried potatoes and zucchini. My mother’s versio is with potatoes and eggplants. During the last years, my mother decides to make a lighter version of this dish and she bakes the vegetables instead of frying them, this shift makes Moussaka tastier. 

Moussakas – The King of Greek cuisine

Get the recipe and start cooking!

You can thank me later.

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